Zuckerberg: It’s easier to detect a nipple than hate speech with AI

VENTURE BEAT

Zuckerberg: It’s easier to detect
a nipple than hate speech with AI


“One of the pieces of criticism we get that I think is fair is we’re much better able to enforce our nudity policies, for example, than we are hate speech,” Zuckerberg said. “The reason for that is it’s much easier to make an AI system that can detect a nipple than it is to determine what is linguistically hate speech, so this is something I think we will make progress on and we’ll get better at over time. These are not unsolvable problems.”



AI researchers allege that machine learning is alchemy

SCIENCE MAG

AI researchers allege that
machine learning is alchemy


The issue is distinct from AI's reproducibility problem, in which researchers can't replicate each other's results because of inconsistent experimental and publication practices. It also differs from the "black box" or "interpretability" problem in machine learning: the difficulty of explaining how a particular AI has come to its conclusions. As Rahimi puts it, "I'm trying to draw a distinction between a machine learning system that's a black box and an entire field that's become a black box."



Biased Algorithms Are Everywhere, and No One Seems to Care

TECHNOLOGY REVIEW

Biased Algorithms Are Everywhere,
and No One Seems to Care


Cathy O’Neil, a mathematician and the author of Weapons of Math Destruction, a book that highlights the risk of algorithmic bias in many contexts, says people are often too willing to trust in mathematical models because they believe it will remove human bias. “[Algorithms] replace human processes, but they’re not held to the same standards,” she says. “People trust them too much.”



Scientists plan huge European AI hub to compete with US

GUARDIAN

Scientists plan huge European
AI hub to compete with US


Named the European Lab for Learning and Intelligent Systems, or Ellis, the proposed AI institute would have major centres in a handful of countries, the UK included, with each employing hundreds of computer engineers, mathematicians and other scientists with the express aim of keeping Europe at the forefront of AI research.



The Revolution Hasn’t Happened Yet

THE VERGE


The Revolution Hasn’t Happened Yet


Actor Robert Downey Jr. and his wife, producer Susan Downey, are making an artificial intelligence documentary series on YouTube, the company announced today. The series will have eight episodes that are each an hour long and it’s set to air on the paid membership-based YouTube Red platform next year.

The series is still untitled, but we do know that Robert Downey Jr. will host and narrate the series, which will feature scientists, philosophers, and other experts in AI. YouTube says the series will explore how AI transforms the way we work and live in the present and future. The series will be executive produced by the Downeys through their production company Team Downey.



London hospitals to replace doctors and nurses with AI for some tasks

GUARDIAN

London hospitals to replace doctors
and nurses with AI for some tasks


The three-year partnership between University College London Hospitals (UCLH) and the Alan Turing Institute aims to bring the benefits of the machine learning revolution to the NHS on an unprecedented scale.

Prof Bryan Williams, director of research at University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, said that the move could have a major impact on patient outcomes, drawing parallels with the transformation of the consumer experience by companies such as Amazon and Google.



To Build Truly Intelligent Machines, Teach Them Cause and Effect

QUANTA MAGAZINE

To Build Truly Intelligent Machines,
Teach Them Cause and Effect


Artificial intelligence owes a lot of its smarts to Judea Pearl. In the 1980s he led efforts that allowed machines to reason probabilistically. Now he’s one of the field’s sharpest critics. In his latest book, “The Book of Why: The New Science of Cause and Effect,” he argues that artificial intelligence has been handicapped by an incomplete understanding of what intelligence really is.



Google Assistant fired a gun: We need to talk

Engadget

Google Assistant fired a gun:
We need to talk


For better or worse, Google Assistant can do it all. From mundane tasks like turning on your lights and setting reminders to convincingly mimicking human speech patterns, the AI helper is so capable it's scary. Its latest (unofficial) ability, though, is a bit more sinister. Artist Alexander Reben recently taught Assistant to fire a gun. Fortunately, the victim was an apple, not a living being. The 30-second video, simply titled "Google Shoots," shows Reben saying, "OK Google, activate gun." Barely a second later, a buzzer goes off, the gun fires and Assistant responds, "Sure, turning on the gun." On the surface, the footage is underwhelming -- nothing visually arresting is happening. But peel back the layers even a little and it's obvious that this project is meant to provoke a conversation on the boundaries of what AI should be allowed to do.



Why Did Microsoft Acquire Semantic Machines, A Conversational AI Startup?

Analytics India Mag

Why Did Microsoft Acquire Semantic Machines,
A Conversational AI Startup?


Voice-based intelligent platforms have become quite popular over the years and tech giants are adopting them as a way to offer consumer-centric services. Whether it is Apple’s Siri, Google’s Assistant or Microsoft’s Cortana, the list is growing at a significant pace. While these platforms use artificial intelligence to a great extent, a perfect conversational AI is yet to be achieved.



Could A.I. redistribute wealth for us?

BIG THINK

Could A.I. redistribute wealth for us?


Wealth inequality is one of the great moral issues of our time. In an era when the world has more money than ever before, billions still live on less than $3 a day. The disparity becomes more striking in the light of studies that show most income inequality comes down to luck, with people of average talent able to shoot to the top of the ladder by being in the right place at the right time.

Making the problem even more severe is the specter of automated unemployment, or the so-called AI revolution. As countless jobs have been lost to automation already and 30% of American jobs are at risk of being automated out of existence within the next thirteen years, it may not be long before mass unemployment caused by automation intensifies the difficulty and urgency of solving the inequality problem.