AI FEED

MIT TECHNOLOGY REVIEW

Biased Algorithms Are Everywhere,
and No One Seems to Care


This week a group of researchers, together with the American Civil Liberties Union, launched an effort to identify and highlight algorithmic bias. The AI Now initiative was announced at an event held at MIT to discuss what many experts see as a growing challenge.

Algorithmic bias is shaping up to be a major societal issue at a critical moment in the evolution of machine learning and AI. If the bias lurking inside the algorithms that make ever-more-important decisions goes unrecognized and unchecked, it could have serious negative consequences, especially for poorer communities and minorities. The eventual outcry might also stymie the progress of an incredibly useful technology (see “Inspecting Algorithms for Bias”).

Algorithms that may conceal hidden biases are already routinely used to make vital financial and legal decisions. Proprietary algorithms are used to decide, for instance, who gets a job interview, who gets granted parole, and who gets a loan.

The founders of the new AI Now Initiative, Kate Crawford, a researcher at Microsoft, and Meredith Whittaker, a researcher at Google, say bias may exist in all sorts of services and products.


MIT TECHNOLOGY REVIEW

Forget Killer Robots—
Bias Is the Real AI Danger


Google’s AI chief isn’t fretting about super-intelligent killer robots. Instead, John Giannandrea is concerned about the danger that may be lurking inside the machine-learning algorithms used to make millions of decisions every minute.

“The real safety question, if you want to call it that, is that if we give these systems biased data, they will be biased,” Giannandrea said before a recent Google conference on the relationship between humans and AI systems.

The problem of bias in machine learning is likely to become more significant as the technology spreads to critical areas like medicine and law, and as more people without a deep technical understanding are tasked with deploying it. Some experts warn that algorithmic bias is already pervasive in many industries, and that almost no one is making an effort to identify or correct it (see “Biased Algorithms Are Everywhere, and No One Seems to Care”).

“It’s important that we be transparent about the training data that we are using, and are looking for hidden biases in it, otherwise we are building biased systems,” Giannandrea added. “If someone is trying to sell you a black box system for medical decision support, and you don’t know how it works or what data was used to train it, then I wouldn’t trust it.”


Sahip olduğumuz çeşitli önyargılar (üstelik belli belirsiz de olabilir) aldığımız kararları etkiliyor. Buna BIAS deniliyor ve insanın şaşırtıcı oranda Cognitive Bias'ları olduğunu biliyoruz. Aynı durum karar mekanizmasına gözü kapalı güvenmeye çalıştığımız yapay zekalar için de geçerli. Öldürücü süper zeki yapay zeka robotlarından önce, bizim için karar verirken BIAS'lardan etkilenen yapay zekalar daha güçlü bir tehdit oluşturabilir.

MILITRAY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS

Artificial intelligence can help
warfighters on many fronts


AI makes it possible for machines to learn from experiences, adapt to new data, and perform human-like tasks. Deep learningand natural-language processing techniques are helping to train computers to accomplish specific tasks by processing large amounts of data and recognizing patterns within it. The technology is increasingly seen as helpful to the warfighter.


Putin, "Gelecekte Yapay Zeka'nın hakimi kimse, dünyanın da hakimi de o olacak" diye açıklama yapmıştı hatırlarsanız. Birçoğumuz biliyor ki savaş endüstrisi yüzyıllardır teknolojinin itici güçlerinden biri. Bu gerçeği değiştirmek imkansız ama otonom silahlarla ilgili çalışmalar ve etik kaygılar tekrar gündemde. Hatta geçenlerde Google çalışanları yapılan askeri destekle ilgili geri adım atmayı tercih edip duyuru yapmışlardı. Fakat yine de AI ve machine learning savaş teknolojileri için taktik anlamında çok hızlı ilerlemeye devam ediyor. Birçok anlamda maliyetleri düşürüp, askeri taktik verme konusunda big data'nın önemi de gündemi meşgul eden araştırmalardan.

TECHXPLORE

AI is acquiring a sense of smell that
can detect illnesses in human breath


Artificial intelligence (AI) is best known for its ability to see (as in driverless cars) and listen (as in Alexa and other home assistants). From now on, it may also smell. My colleagues and I are developing an AI system that can smell human breath and learn how to identify a range of illness-revealing substances that we might breathe out.


TED


Scared of superintelligent AI? You should be, says neuroscientist and philosopher Sam Harris -- and not just in some theoretical way. We're going to build superhuman machines, says Harris, but we haven't yet grappled with the problems associated with creating something that may treat us the way we treat ants.


Süper-zeki yapay zekalardan korkmalı mıyız? Sam Harris, sinirbilim ve felsefe temelleri üzerinden bu alandaki soruları yanıtlamaya çalışıyor. Fakat yine o da, tüm araştırmacılar gibi insanın yönelimlerini ve bu zekayı kullanma biçimlerini değerlendiriyor.

YOUTUBE


What do you get when you give a design tool a digital nervous system? Computers that improve our ability to think and imagine, and robotic systems that come up with (and build) radical new designs for bridges, cars, drones and much more -- all by themselves. Take a tour of the Augmented Age with futurist Maurice Conti and preview a time when robots and humans will work side-by-side to accomplish things neither could do alone.


WIRED

GOOGLE’S NEW AI HEAD IS SO SMART
HE DOESN’T NEED AI

 


The new AI boss at Google is Jeff Dean. The lean 50-year-old computer scientist joined the company in 1999, when it was a startup less than one year old. He earned a reputation as one of the industry’s most talented coders by helping Google become a computational powerhouse with new approaches to databases and large-scale data analysis. Google colleagues once created a joke website of “Jeff Dean facts,” including his purported role in accelerating the speed of light. Another had it that Dean doesn’t really exist—he’s an advanced AI created by Jeff Dean.


THE VERGE

Robert Downey Jr. is making a YouTube Red
series about artificial intelligence


Actor Robert Downey Jr. and his wife, producer Susan Downey, are making an artificial intelligence documentary series on YouTube, the company announced today. The series will have eight episodes that are each an hour long and it’s set to air on the paid membership-based YouTube Red platform next year.

The series is still untitled, but we do know that Robert Downey Jr. will host and narrate the series, which will feature scientists, philosophers, and other experts in AI. YouTube says the series will explore how AI transforms the way we work and live in the present and future. The series will be executive produced by the Downeys through their production company Team Downey.


ENGADGET

Pretty sure Google’s new talking
AI just beat the Turing test


So that whole Turing test metric, wherein we gauge how human-like an AI system appears to be based on its ability to mimic our vocal affectations? At the 2018 I/O developers conference Tuesday, Google utterly dismantled it. The company did so by having its AI-driven Assistant book a reservation. On the phone. With a live, unsuspecting human on the other end of the line. And it worked flawlessly.


QZ

AI is the new space race.
Here’s what the biggest countries are doing


The United States and China currently dominate the world of artificial intelligence, but used very different approaches to get there. While the US’s academic system has generated and incubated the research that made today’s AI possible, China’s government has pledged billions in funding and offered the technology its full-throated support.

China is investing at least $7 billion through 2030, including $2 billion for a research park in Beijing. The Chinese government foresees a $150 billion AI industry by that time, and has the most comprehensive national plan to become a leader in the technology. Chinese startups also received 48% of all funding for AI investments, according to CB Insights.


VENTURE BEAT

Zuckerberg: It’s easier to detect
a nipple than hate speech with AI


“One of the pieces of criticism we get that I think is fair is we’re much better able to enforce our nudity policies, for example, than we are hate speech,” Zuckerberg said. “The reason for that is it’s much easier to make an AI system that can detect a nipple than it is to determine what is linguistically hate speech, so this is something I think we will make progress on and we’ll get better at over time. These are not unsolvable problems.”


SCIENCE MAG

AI researchers allege that
machine learning is alchemy


The issue is distinct from AI's reproducibility problem, in which researchers can't replicate each other's results because of inconsistent experimental and publication practices. It also differs from the "black box" or "interpretability" problem in machine learning: the difficulty of explaining how a particular AI has come to its conclusions. As Rahimi puts it, "I'm trying to draw a distinction between a machine learning system that's a black box and an entire field that's become a black box."


TECHNOLOGY REVIEW

Biased Algorithms Are Everywhere,
and No One Seems to Care


Cathy O’Neil, a mathematician and the author of Weapons of Math Destruction, a book that highlights the risk of algorithmic bias in many contexts, says people are often too willing to trust in mathematical models because they believe it will remove human bias. “[Algorithms] replace human processes, but they’re not held to the same standards,” she says. “People trust them too much.”


GUARDIAN

Scientists plan huge European
AI hub to compete with US


Named the European Lab for Learning and Intelligent Systems, or Ellis, the proposed AI institute would have major centres in a handful of countries, the UK included, with each employing hundreds of computer engineers, mathematicians and other scientists with the express aim of keeping Europe at the forefront of AI research.


THE VERGE


The Revolution Hasn’t Happened Yet


Actor Robert Downey Jr. and his wife, producer Susan Downey, are making an artificial intelligence documentary series on YouTube, the company announced today. The series will have eight episodes that are each an hour long and it’s set to air on the paid membership-based YouTube Red platform next year.

The series is still untitled, but we do know that Robert Downey Jr. will host and narrate the series, which will feature scientists, philosophers, and other experts in AI. YouTube says the series will explore how AI transforms the way we work and live in the present and future. The series will be executive produced by the Downeys through their production company Team Downey.


GUARDIAN

London hospitals to replace doctors
and nurses with AI for some tasks


The three-year partnership between University College London Hospitals (UCLH) and the Alan Turing Institute aims to bring the benefits of the machine learning revolution to the NHS on an unprecedented scale.

Prof Bryan Williams, director of research at University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, said that the move could have a major impact on patient outcomes, drawing parallels with the transformation of the consumer experience by companies such as Amazon and Google.


QUANTA MAGAZINE

To Build Truly Intelligent Machines,
Teach Them Cause and Effect


Artificial intelligence owes a lot of its smarts to Judea Pearl. In the 1980s he led efforts that allowed machines to reason probabilistically. Now he’s one of the field’s sharpest critics. In his latest book, “The Book of Why: The New Science of Cause and Effect,” he argues that artificial intelligence has been handicapped by an incomplete understanding of what intelligence really is.


Engadget

Google Assistant fired a gun:
We need to talk


For better or worse, Google Assistant can do it all. From mundane tasks like turning on your lights and setting reminders to convincingly mimicking human speech patterns, the AI helper is so capable it's scary. Its latest (unofficial) ability, though, is a bit more sinister. Artist Alexander Reben recently taught Assistant to fire a gun. Fortunately, the victim was an apple, not a living being. The 30-second video, simply titled "Google Shoots," shows Reben saying, "OK Google, activate gun." Barely a second later, a buzzer goes off, the gun fires and Assistant responds, "Sure, turning on the gun." On the surface, the footage is underwhelming -- nothing visually arresting is happening. But peel back the layers even a little and it's obvious that this project is meant to provoke a conversation on the boundaries of what AI should be allowed to do.


Analytics India Mag

Why Did Microsoft Acquire Semantic Machines,
A Conversational AI Startup?


Voice-based intelligent platforms have become quite popular over the years and tech giants are adopting them as a way to offer consumer-centric services. Whether it is Apple’s Siri, Google’s Assistant or Microsoft’s Cortana, the list is growing at a significant pace. While these platforms use artificial intelligence to a great extent, a perfect conversational AI is yet to be achieved.


BIG THINK

Could A.I. redistribute wealth for us?


Wealth inequality is one of the great moral issues of our time. In an era when the world has more money than ever before, billions still live on less than $3 a day. The disparity becomes more striking in the light of studies that show most income inequality comes down to luck, with people of average talent able to shoot to the top of the ladder by being in the right place at the right time.

Making the problem even more severe is the specter of automated unemployment, or the so-called AI revolution. As countless jobs have been lost to automation already and 30% of American jobs are at risk of being automated out of existence within the next thirteen years, it may not be long before mass unemployment caused by automation intensifies the difficulty and urgency of solving the inequality problem.


Analytics India Mag

Why Did Microsoft Acquire Semantic Machines,
A Conversational AI Startup?


Voice-based intelligent platforms have become quite popular over the years and tech giants are adopting them as a way to offer consumer-centric services. Whether it is Apple’s Siri, Google’s Assistant or Microsoft’s Cortana, the list is growing at a significant pace. While these platforms use artificial intelligence to a great extent, a perfect conversational AI is yet to be achieved.


BBC

Are you scared yet?
Meet Norman, the psychopathic AI


Norman is an algorithm trained to understand pictures but, like its namesake Hitchcock's Norman Bates, it does not have an optimistic view of the world.The psychopathic algorithm was created by a team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, as part of an experiment to see what training AI on data from "the dark corners of the net" would do to its world view.


Guardian

The superhero of artificial intelligence:
can this genius keep it in check?


Demis Hassabis has a modest demeanour and an unassuming countenance, but he is deadly serious when he tells me he is on a mission to “solve intelligence, and then use that to solve everything else”. Coming from almost anyone else, the statement would be laughable; from him, not so much. Hassabis is the 39-year-old former chess master and video-games designer whose artificial intelligence research start-up, DeepMind, was bought by Google in 2014 for a reported $625 million. He is the son of immigrants, attended a state comprehensive in Finchley and holds degrees from Cambridge and UCL in computer science and cognitive neuroscience. A “visionary” manager, according to those who work with him, Hassabis also reckons he has found a way to “make science research efficient” and says he is leading an “Apollo programme for the 21st century”. He’s the sort of normal-looking bloke you wouldn’t look twice at on the street, but Tim Berners-Lee once described him to me as one of the smartest human beings on the planet.